Recent Blog Posts

Student Voices and the Path to Equitable Outcomes

student voices imageOCCRL’s newest Insights on Equity and Outcomes brief, Improving a Path to Equity: Engaging Student Voices, provides an overview of the emerging emphasis in the Pathways to Results (PTR) model on engaging student voices to facilitate practitioner-driven, equitable change in the community college context, as well as the role of student participation in scaling PTR.

PTR’s reliance on practitioners’ engagement with quantitative student-level data is a common feature of many data-driven improvement initiatives in higher education, including Achieving the Dream, Inc. and the Center for Urban Education’s Equity Scorecard; however, as OCCRL has sought to scale the PTR model, it has become obvious that engagement with quantitative data in itself may not always catalyze change. Without qualitative data to give a face and voice to the numbers, practitioners’ perceptions may not change.

This brief provides an overview of recently released resources in the Process and Practice Assessment module that engage students intentionally as informants and experts in their educational experience. When done well, including student voices in the body of collected data also shows promise for supporting stronger alignment between the root cause of outcomes inequities and the selected educational improvement.

This brief was authored by Heather McCambly and Dr. Debra Bragg with the support of the Illinois Community College Board.

headshot HMHeather McCambly, M.A., is the Project Coordinator for the Pathways to Results and Finish Up Illinois initiatives at the Office of Community College Research and Leadership. Her research has centered on the equity implications of performance based budgeting and funding systems, intersectional identity and student success, and equity-centered change on the community college campus.

Arizona Sun Corridor – Get Into Energy’s Eight-Tier Stackable Credential Model

AZ Stackable Credentials (2)The Arizona Sun Corridor – Get Into Energy consortium worked with industry to develop a stackable credential model for programs of study in mining and energy at community colleges across the state. The model includes two foundational curriculum courses that can be taken concurrently and can typically be completed in just one semester. In the Career and Personal Development course students learn academic and workplace requirements, and the Energy Industry Fundamentals course covers required industry competencies. Upon students’ completion of these two fundamental courses, colleges help students select an occupational-specific pathway that can include classroom instruction along with on-the-job training, internships, or apprenticeships. The consortium highlights two key factors that contributed to their implementation of the stackable credential model: committed employer engagement, and sustainability as a common goal.

To learn more about the Arizona Sun Corridor – Get Into Energy’s common foundational curriculum, their stackable credential model, and the factors that contribute to their model, read Building a Common Foundational Curriculum with Stackable Credentials.

deborahDeborah Richie serves as a member of the Transformative Change Initiative team at OCCRL. She has 25 years of experience as an administrator at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including 10+ years as a dean at the Graduate College, directing graduate fellowship grants and programs. She is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership

Oregon CASE’s TAA Liaisons Build Partnerships to Support Student Success

CASE ULTIMA_1Oregon had twice the national average rate of TAA certifications between 2007 and 2011. The statewide consortium of 17 colleges serving 36 counties focuses on five broad workforce sectors. The consortium hired a TAA Liaison to coordinate services to improve communications and systems between the colleges, along with TAA and WIA offices, to optimize recruitment and support for TAA-eligible students. The Liaison manages the coordinated effort of all the partners, tracks TAA-eligible students and their outcomes, and conducts outreach targeted towards TAA-eligible individuals. By early this year, CASE has served over 4,700 students, including 284 TAA-eligible students. Oregon CASE is committed to sustaining this work and is moving forward to implement Intergovernmental Agency Agreements between each of the colleges and TAA.

To learn more about the partnerships developed by Oregon CASE to support TAA-eligible students, read Building Intentional Partnerships to Sustain Student Success.

deborahDeborah Richie serves as a member of the Transformative Change Initiative team at OCCRL. She has 25 years of experience as an administrator at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including 10+ years as a dean at the Graduate College, directing graduate fellowship grants and programs. She is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership.

Seven Observations on how Education Leaders can Create Next Generation Learning Environments for College and Career Success

observationsDr. Richard Halverson, professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shared information and strategies that will be useful for educational leaders as they create innovative, next generation learning environments that facilitate college and career success. This Pathways Resource Center webinar recorded on August 3, 2015, is available below.  The webinar recording and presentation slides are now available.

Seeds of Transformative Change: Evidence of What Works from TAACCCT

The Transformative Change Initiative is proud to sponsor two meetings in conjunction with the American Evaluation Association meeting to be held in Chicago, Illinois on November 10 and 11, 2015.


November 10, 2015
TCI Research Symposium: Evidence of What Works from TAACCCT

Orange and Blue Room
Illini Center, 200 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois
8:30am to 3:30pm

Making Graphs2_2On November 10, 2015, the TCI Evaluation Collaborative will host a meeting for individuals interested in giving research papers that reflect results from the third-party evaluations of TAACCCT. This meeting will feature 8-10 research paper presentations, with discussant feedback.  Please see the Call for Papers to apply to present a research paper for this Symposium. Individuals selected to present papers may be eligible to receive up to two nights lodging to support their participation in the Symposium (limit of support for two authors per paper).


November 11, 2015
TCI Evaluation Collaborative Meeting: Approaches to Evaluation that Foster Transformative Change

Orange and Blue Room
Illini Center, 200 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois
8:30am to 11:30am

JankowskiOn November 11, 2015, from 8:30am to 11:30am, the TCI Evaluation Collaborative will host an interactive meeting that is open to anyone who is interested in sharing and learning about evaluation associated with transformative change in the community college. This session will feature a nationally recognized leader in evaluation, Dr. Natasha Jankowski. Dr. Jankowski is the Associate Director of the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

This meeting is open to anyone who is interested in sharing and learning about evaluation associated with transformative change in the community college. There is no registration fee to attend this meeting. Breakfast will be provided. Reservation is required to attend and will be honored on a first come first serve basis. Reserve your seat for this meeting here.


 

020 tmc v1Heather L. Fox is a project coordinator for OCCRL. Heather is passionate about supporting community college efforts to provide students with equitable and high quality career pathways.

Please contact Heather with any inquires about either of these events.